Westminster fountain at sunset

by Jorge Córdoba

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In a few months I'll be going to Scotland for a holiday (highlands and so on). So far, along with my 550D I have the standard kit lens 18-55mm, and I have recently bought the 55-250mm II. I am planning to buy an other lens, either the canon 50mm f1.4 or the canon 10-22mm.

I like the 50mm because it lets a lot of light in and it can be used in the evenings without using much flash in low-light conditions, not to mention the delicious bokeh!. However I have always liked the effects of the 10-22mm as well. And I understand that it's more creatively versatile and I can use it for Scotland highlands and castles

Eventually i'll be buying both, but I am stuck over which one should I get before the holiday. Which lens would you get if you were faced with the same dilemma? Budget not an issue, preferably I just want to get one of those only before august!.

Thanks Luke

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Search for "lens" and "trip" and you will find great advice about trips and photography, such as photo.stackexchange.com/questions/22285/… –  Danny T. May 14 '12 at 12:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm trying to think of the usual subjects that you might encounter on a trip to Scotland.

  1. The landscape
  2. Ancient and modern architecture
  3. Details - a glass of whisky, gargoyles, moss, cobbled streets, and so forth
  4. Wildlife

For landscape photos I would suggest you can get away with your kit lens, but the 10-22 is a great option here.

For architecture the 10-22mm also works well, although you might need a tripod for darker shots as the aperture doesn't open up as much.

The detail shots is where the 50mm 1.4 would work reasonably well, especially as you suggest for the bokeh. However, you can get good macro and reasonable bokeh with the kit lens, and the image stabilisation on there will also help in darker conditions.

Finally, you have the wildlife aspect reasonably well covered by the 55-250mm, although I would recommend a tripod or preferably monopod for a long shot on a gloomy day.

Overall I would probably recommend the 10-22mm as it's a great lens that gives you a lot more options. You can always get the 50mm 1.8 instead of the 1.4 if you've a spare £90 lying around.

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Great answer thanks! Everyone seems to be suggesting the 10-22 option. Will go along with that :) –  Light Alchemist May 14 '12 at 17:32

The 10-22mm albeit more expensive, is better suited for scenery photographs. With a crop factor of 1.6 with a 50mm fixed lens, you'd be buying a fixed 80mm - which might be too much for certain pictures.

I'd go for the 10-22mm.

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I live in Edinburgh, 2 bits of local knowledge:

Scotland is not renowned for its sunshine so wider apertures are helpful.

Non photographically, parts of the countryside are prone to midges (swarms of very small flies), an insect repellent is practically an essential otherwise they will make your life miserable. Google for the parts you are travelling to, but in general if outdoors in the Highlands pack midge repellent.

I lied, 3 pieces of knowledge, it rains here, pack waterproofs.

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Thanks for the advice, will make sure we buy some repellent! –  Light Alchemist May 14 '12 at 17:35

If i had to choose one, in your condition, i would go with the 10-22mm because I think you'll have more opportunities for wide angle shots and landscapes. I love my 50mm, but for me personally I don't like using it for wide angle shots, landscapes, and stuff where i want to get a lot into the frame. it's great for close ups, and people. But landscapes, and castles, and stuff, if it were me, i would go with the 10-22mm.

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