Serene Life

by garik

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I've seen plaq mounted photos that seem to be laminated on MDF board. I'm interested in producing my own plaq mounts. What is the equipment and process involved?

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2 Answers 2

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I found the following article after a good hour of searching around. There are a zillion places that offer to do plaq/block/artblock mounting for you, but this was the only one I could find that actually explained the process:

How to Plaque Mount Posters using MDF

Hope its helpful.

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It's better than nothing - I think my frame place uses heat activated adhesive and laminate; that process requires a press. –  Canon Gangsta Nov 2 '10 at 17:39

This is going back a lot of years, but my grandfather did this using wood and polyurethane, but that was with film-based prints. I'm not entirely sure if the same process would work with prints from an inkjet printer, but you could try it with a small sample, just give it a lengthy time to dry thoroughly (at least 24 hours).

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I do believe this kind of mount works for digital prints, as I have purchased Giclée art block prints from DeviantArt.com. I am not certain how, exactly, they do the mounting, but the Giclée printing process is a high quality ink jet on satin printing process. –  jrista Aug 6 '10 at 6:32
    
@jrista I'm familiar with the lab DA uses, their mounted Giclée is spray adhesive... one of the 3M Super Spray versions (77 or 72 I think) on the back of the print and the face of the wood, then under a roller to adhere them and left to cure, there is an optional spray coating, but it's a very thin one, and is for protection/gloss, not mounting. –  cabbey Apr 13 '11 at 19:52
    
The old wood and poly process John's talking about is pretty different, it involves placing the paper on the face of the wood, usually with a noticeable amount of wood showing around it, then covering the whole thing with poly, usually pretty thick. If you're familiar with decoupage, you can almost think of this as a heavy version of that. (My mother and I mounted a lot of poetry that way back in the day.) –  cabbey Apr 13 '11 at 19:53

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