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I am buying Canon EOS 60D. I am looking to put together a starter kit and I saw this question talking about two good lenses to get for a not-so-expensive Canon camera.

However, that question is from Oct 2010.

Have newer/better lenses have come to the market in the past year and a half that are much better suited to the 60D?

In other words, what are good starter-kit lenses for the Canon EOS 60D?

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This really depends on what you normally shoot. The 18-135 is an OK starter kit lens; good for many situations but a master of none. –  Jakub Feb 7 '12 at 16:04
    
I see myself taking two kinds of pictures: portraits of people / motorcycles, and outdoors-nature. –  Raj More Feb 7 '12 at 16:23
1  
If the earlier question is no longer relevant, we should update it so that it is relevant again, or close it. Meta discussion here: meta.photo.stackexchange.com/questions/1712/… –  mattdm Feb 7 '12 at 21:15
1  
I see lots of issues with this question as is. First of all in it's current form it is a duplicate of the earlier question mattdm pointed out. If it is outdated(which it isn't) you could offer a bounty or edit it to encourage new answers. The big difference I see is that this thread has no monetary bounds, where as that question had a 500 quid limit. Also "portaits, motorcycles, and nature" is extremely broad to select two "good" lenses. If money is not a limit, pick up a 17-55 f/2.8 IS, and a 70-200mm f/2.8 IS II. But I would assume we all have a monetary limit so please list. –  dpollitt Feb 8 '12 at 19:42
    
possible duplicate of What is a good two lens "starter kit"? –  mattdm Feb 21 '12 at 0:06

6 Answers 6

I think there is an 18-135mm kit option - that would be good for a starter zoom. But if money allows, then I'd recommend the EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM. This is not new to market - but I am putting it out there as an option.

It's a stonking good lens. Almost the same focal range as the standard kit 18-55, but with L series optics (though Canon will never label it as such as it's an EF-S lens designed for crop-sensor only), and a fast constant f/2.8 aperture through the entire zoom range WITH image stabilisation.

I had this lens for a couple of years, and only sold it only because I moved to using mostly prime lenses.

Would be the perfect companion to the 60D. The weight of it would balance out nicely too...

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Stonking? British? –  dpollitt Feb 8 '12 at 16:30
    
Stonking.... as in brilliant, awesome... :) –  Mike Feb 8 '12 at 18:47

When you are buying lenses, just remember that they will last LONG enough than your camera body. So it's always suggested to be wise while buying lens.

If you are planning to do professional quality model photography, event photography (for example wedding) etc then straight go with Tamron's 28-75mm f/2.8 . Its an all purpose lens with outstanding image quality at cheap price and it can compete with it's rival from canon's 24-70m f/2.8 L USM. But that canon lens costs almost 3 times than this Tamron. Beside that please buy a 50mm f/1.8

If you are planning to use your camera for general photos, family photos, travel photos then buy 18-135mm and another 50mm f/1.8 . The 18-135 focal range will save you from changing your lens in a busy road or in an awkward moment without missing the moment :) If you want to save some money, then buy Tamron/Sigmas 18-200mm.

If you are planning to do only landscape, nature etc - then buy 18-55 and one 55-250.

Thats mainly it :)

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the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/… - Not an overwhelmingly great review of the Tamron.... –  Simon Feb 22 '12 at 14:08

I think the reply you linked is still valid, the 18-135mm and 18-200mm are the best starter lens for the 60D.

I bought my 60D shortly after it was introduced, and I've got it with the 18-135mm kit lens. I have purchased a few more lenses after that, but the 18-135mm is still my default lens, that's the one I keep attached to the camera at all times as a general purpose lens.

If you think you will be shooting indoors in low light situations then I concur with Mike in that adding the 17-55mm f/2.8 is an excellent choice, but expensive. Tamron and Sigma make a 17-50mm f/2.8, and these are more economical and still pretty decent options for the 60D.

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I think you should consider the EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM which, according to reviews, is a high quality lens. It's not an L series lens but it does have some optical qualities of an L-series lens. (3 aspherical elements, 1 UD glass element)

This lens is Ultra-Wide on the wide end which will be great for your motorcycle shots and landscape. (15 is much wider then 18). If you are primarily shooting motorcycles and you are interested in a good artistic twist, you might also want to consider the Rokinon 8mm fisheye as your next lens. (This should not be your initial kit though)

As for portraits, I own the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM and I love this lens. Ideal for for portraits on the APS-C. Excellent bokeh and very fast.

You can pick up these two high quality lenses for roughly $1100 ($739.00 for the 15-85mm and $369.00 for the 50mm f/1.4) I think this combination is an interesting alternative to the already mentioned EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS which is an excellent lens but currently goes for about $1,040.

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I love my 50mm F1.4 and 17-55 F2.8 zoom. I strongly disliked the 28-135 that came with my 50D, it was slow, and would close down to F5.6 too quickly. Plus even when used in bright lights, it was not very sharp.

For motorcycles at speed, you want something fairly long. On my Nikon F, I used a 500MM F8 mirror for shooting road racing. On a crop like the 60D, I'd start with something that goes at least to 250mm. Good news is that most motorcycle racing happens in the daytime and often in full sun, so you can get a more inexpensive lens (F4 or slower) and still be happy.

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What does "On a crop like the 60D" mean? –  Raj More Feb 27 '12 at 15:58

Nobody mentioned a normal prime ? The sigma 30mm F1.4 EX DC HSM is a good one for APS-C sensors.

Every kit should include at least a normal prime. Seems more important then short tele, but then again that depends on who shoots.

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This is well-covered in the answers to the existing question. –  mattdm Feb 8 '12 at 14:33

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