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Do video cameras have the image sensors cameras have?

I really don't know what I'm talking about, so if the answer was explained, I would really appreciate it.

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While some questions about video cameras are on topic here, we try to have them answer this question "Can I use this information in still photography?", if they do not answer that, then they are probably off topic here. See the FAQ for more info photo.stackexchange.com/faq –  dpollitt Dec 23 '11 at 19:40
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+1 to what dpollit says. Arguably, this question has a the between-the-lines aspect of "so, if they are the same, can I use them in still photography?" –  mattdm Dec 23 '11 at 19:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes. Digital video cameras use these sensors, usually CCDs but CMOS too. These are the same designs use for still cameras but with less pixels, since even HD footage only needs 2 MP. For HD cameras, the shape of the sensor is often different to match the 16:9 aspect of widescreen footage.

The major difference you will encounter are cameras labelled as 3 CCD. Again this is the same type of sensor but there are 3 of them, one for each of red, green and blue. Special prisms are used to divide incoming light and reflect it towards each sensor. On a conventional digital camera, colors are almost always divided between adjacent pixels using a Bayer filter. There are some Sigma cameras which use special Foveon sensors which capture different colors in layers instead.

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+1 great answer. I don't have edit privileges, so please change "One a conventional digital camera..." to "On a conventional... –  wizlog Dec 23 '11 at 20:19

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