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Just got a lovely Canon S90, sits in my bag at all times and is already giving me much joy.

A quick question - should I put it in a camera wrap or will the built-in lens cover provide the protection required? Does anyone have any other comments or suggestions about protecting this camera?

UPDATE: I bought a Lowe Pro belt-mounted case with the press stud when I bought the camera, but:

a. It feels unsecure and vulnerable there
b. It looks a bit nerdy
c. It still adds a few seconds to 'draw time'.

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4 Answers 4

It depends on what else you have in your bag (keys etc), but considering cases are relatively cheap for point and shoot cameras, you might as well get one just in case. Better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

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I don't want to use a case because I don't want the hassle of taking it out, putting it back in again etc. Thought a wrap would be easier but not sure how much protection they afford. –  5arx Sep 26 '11 at 11:12
3  
How much hassle is a simple slip case with one popper button? Less hassle than a scratched LCD, for one. –  ElendilTheTall Sep 26 '11 at 12:02
    
Marginally more hassle than what you'd get with a wrap with a bit of velcro. I bought the S90 because I wasn't taking enough pics with my Nikon dSLR with all its bulk, lenses, bags and paraphenalia - getting a case will detract from this and defeat the object of the exercise. I want to be ready at least 99% of the time. –  5arx Sep 26 '11 at 13:05
    
Trying it out will only cost you about $3. –  ysap Sep 26 '11 at 13:06

It's been a couple years since I've regularly used a P&S camera, but at the time I didn't use any sort of case for it. My philosophy at the time was that every hurdle between thinking about taking a picture and actually taking it meant more of a chance that I wouldn't take the picture: for me, having a case would mean I'd take fewer pictures.

When I bought my camera and it arrived all shiny and new, I knew that not having a case would mean my camera would get scuffed up -- and it did (not bad, there were no big dings or cracks or anything, but it was visibly used), but I treated them like badges of honor, proof of the adventures the camera had seen.

I did put an LCD protector (one of those clear, sticky sheets) over the LCD, though. The two really sensitive parts of the camera (provided you don't damage something like the battery or SD card door or hinge) are the lens, which of course retracts into the body and gets covered, and the LCD. So as long as you keep those two things protected, the camera should remain functional even if it gets scuffed up a bit.

I'm not sure what kind of bag you're talking about using, though. Usually I kept my camera in a pocket of its own in my shorts or pants. When I went on vacations I'd put it into a pocket in my backpack but I wouldn't put anything in there that could scratch it badly, like my keys. With a case you don't have to think about that ahead of time (as long as you don't mind the case getting scratched up), which I imagine would be nice.

(If you do get an LCD protector: I'd recommend getting one of those packs with like 6 or 10 sheets in it: the first time I put one on an LCD, it took me 2 or 3 tries to get it right (smoothing out the bubbles and cutting it to the right size and so on). Having extra sheets will let you practice a couple times if you need to, and will make it easier to replace the protector after a few months when the first one gets scratched up or starts to lift off the LCD.)

Edit: After thinking about my answer for a couple hours, I remembered two more things that you may think are important: first is that I only used my camera for one year. It was in great condition (apart from the surface blemishes) after that year, but this means that I don't know what might have happened longer-term. Second is that I lost my camera after only one year. I left it at the airport in a rental car after I returned it: because I always carried it in a pocket of my shorts, I frequently took it out of my pocket and left it in one of those cubby-holes in the door. They're really convenient for holding your camera while you're driving around, but when you drop off the car and you're in a rush to make your flight, having your camera in a bag you won't forget is maybe a little more secure.

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Thanks for the lengthy response, and sorry you lost your camera. I do that with mobile phones quite a lot, it sucks. Agree totally that 'having a case would mean [you'd] take fewer pictures' and your point about 'badges of honour'. I'll definitely get a screen protector on your recommendation. –  5arx Sep 27 '11 at 8:28

It may be quick, but a wrap with a Velcro will certainly announce your intentions!

My ready to use camera is actually in a bag made of bubbles. Some computer hardware came in it and I've been using it for a few years. The strap hangs out, so taking the camera out, is just pulling on it.

Your other option is case that hangs from your belt. Lowepro makes some that close with a simple flap (I've got 2 of those as well for my ultra-compact outing camera). Again, the camera strap hangs out, you can pull the flag and camera in one move.

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I have a Canon S90 and use the Case Logic TBC-302 Ultra Compact Camera Case to protect it. If you look at the link above the sixth image is a picture of the S90 inside of the case. It fits perfectly, and is a very small and compact case. It fits into my own pants pocket when I am on the go, so it still keeps the camera small and portable.

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