Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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A user named Nir posted in another thread about the "Sunny 16" rule, referring to the fact that when shooting in full sunlight, proper settings are usually f16, and then 1/ISO for the shutter speed.

What are some other tips or tricks like this? For example, tricks to photograph snow, or dancers in a theater, or starscapes. Anything really. I hope this question isn't too general, but I think it will be a helpful resource for many.

I'm not looking for tips on photography basics, but rather situational tips and tricks that you have found work really well all the time.

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This is probably too broad - searching 'tips' on our search yields vasts amount and this would theoretically combine them all. I think this needs to be more specific. –  rfusca Jul 27 '11 at 17:23
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closed as not a real question by rfusca, ElendilTheTall, mattdm, ahockley, John Cavan Jul 27 '11 at 21:10

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

-3.5 stops takes middle grey to full shadow +3.5 stops takes middle grey to blown highlight

This is very useful when evaluating how to adjust appearance of elements in the frame based on overall exposure. Look up the 'Zone system' for more.


A bad camera you have is better than a good one you don't have.


Upgrading the photographer, not gear, is the best way to achieve better results.

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I especially like the last one. –  Jon Jul 27 '11 at 19:40
    
Took me a while to realize it :) –  ishmaiel Jul 27 '11 at 20:10
    
What happens when your camera's dynamic range is more than 7 stops? (like most DSLRs)... –  Nick Bedford Jul 28 '11 at 1:00
    
The +/- 3.5 stops is an operational definition and keeps you safe from blocking/blowing shadows/highlights. With an 8-bit output image, this gives a 7-stop latitude which gives you 1 left for error. Remapping from camera's dynamic range to the image's dynamic range is the critical step. –  ishmaiel Jul 28 '11 at 19:22
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