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Redscaling is a technique where the film gets exposed in the wrong side. This creates a strong red hue in the images and it's very cool. You should definitely try it if you never did.

So, what would happen if a redscale a black&white film? Nothing? Inverted images? Has anyone tried it?

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2 Answers 2

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Having accidentally wound an entire batch of cassettes backwards in the bag I can tell you it's not nearly as impressive as redscaling color film. The image will be slightly softer, and it will behave as if it was filtered with a slightly orange/brown-tinted ND filter (not the same as red or yellow, somewhere in between) due to the light passing through the film stock before it reacts with the chemistry. You'll also have more scratches in the film since the fragile chemistry side will be exposed to the mechanical parts that normally only see the smooth polyester base side of the film. Once I realized the mistake a couple rolls into the batch and started to compensate by treating it as slower film than it actually was I was largely able to ignore it and move on with my assignments... that's how minimal the effect was.

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"You'll also have more scratches in the film since the fragile chemistry side will be exposed to the mechanical parts that normally only see the smooth polyester base side of the film" So that's why all my redscale films end up all scratched! Thanks Cabbey! –  Andres Apr 28 '11 at 20:54

Since redscaling tends to virtually eliminate blue tones and emphasise red ones, it would probably have a similar effect to using a red filter: red and yellow objects would be lighter, blue objects (especially the sky) would be dark. It would probably work well for landscapes.

In any case, there's only one way to know for sure: go forth and photograph! We look forward to your report :)

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But the B&W film has layers as a color film? Inverting the color layers makes the red hue, but if there's only one layer available... That why I think there will be no changes at all, but maybe I'm missing something :F –  Andres Apr 28 '11 at 15:58
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I agree, the B&W film doesn't have layers that react to color differently. I think it would simply behave like a two-stop ND filter. It might have some effect on grain possibly, if grains of different size were at different depths... –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Apr 28 '11 at 17:07

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