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What are the good softboxes for a small flash like a Canon Speedlite 430EX, for example?

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See also Are small on-flash softboxes useful, or a gimmick? –  mattdm Jun 22 '11 at 15:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Lastolite make an ezybox which is pretty "good" but it really depends on how you term "good". Do you want:

  • Small when collapsed
  • Durable and long-lasting
  • Big (bigger the light source, the softer the light)
  • Affordable?

Have you also considered just using a shoot-through unbrella?

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I should add that size of light source is not the only factor in light softness. It depends on both the size of source and distance from subject ;) –  matt burns Jul 22 '10 at 13:03

At Strobist there is a review of LumiQuest Softbox III. You can also use a hotshoe adapter for regular softboxes (such as the one sold by Lastolite).

(Dislaimer: Haven't personally tried any of those, was always afraid softboxes are too complicated to set up.)

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I love my EzyBox 60x60cm for use with speedlights.
The packed size is smaller(!) than the 43x43cm Ezybox, and it is way more versatile than my Lumiquest III thingies.

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LumiQuest Softbox makes the best on flash softbox. I use this for all indoor/outdoor (dawn/dusk )shots and on the go shots. (Wedding, Baby, and Engagment) It attaches with Velcro on the end of the flash. Full tilt and rotate are not impacted.

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I've experimented with a lot of these devices and agree that the EzyBox is probably the best, but honestly I find that a flash bounced off the ceiling or wall with the little white card thing pulled up (or a business card taped on) is really the best bet for most scenarios. Check out my blog for a book review of On-Camera Flash to see some amazing stuff, and I've done many of those types of shots with less sophisticated flash attachments than Neil uses.

I also have interviewed some of the top photographers in the world on my blog and I find that many don't even bother with mods beyond the card trick I mention above. It's only the prosumers that obsess over flash modifiers

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For what it's worth: light modifiers are the bread-and-butter of so much serious photography. That doesn't necessarily mean the latest Gary Fong gizmo, but controlling light is crucially important. –  mattdm Nov 9 '11 at 18:36

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