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by garik

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I just recently bought Aperture 3 and I already have iPhoto 11.

My iPhoto has thousands of pictures. Many are dupes. Many are low quality from a 1MP (yeah, remember those?) camera.

However, I have recently upgraded my camera (Sony A55) and I have an iPhone 4. What I am thinking of doing is using iPhoto as a "catch all" to import everything.

Then use Aperture for picking the "best of the best" out of iPhoto. Aperture would also be used for greater photo editing once I learn how to use it.

Does this logic seem good? Or would you point Aperture to the existing iPhoto library to save space?

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

I would definitely point Aperture to the iPhoto library. In fact, I'd ditch iPhoto altogether and just use OSX's Image Capture to import my photos.

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I really hate Image Capture. It's so slow when you have hundreds of pictures. Shame really considering when I plug my iPhone into my Windows 7 machine I can browse the pictures really fast. So you ditched iPhoto completely? –  cbmeeks Mar 30 '11 at 11:28
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iPhoto is in fact just as slow as Image Capture when you have a lot of images on your camera, because they seem to share the same architecture. If you open Image Capture, let it find all your images, then open iPhoto, you'll find that iPhoto will have already found them all as well! The best solution is to make secure backups every time you import a set of photos, then wipe them off the card, so there are only ever the minimum photos on the card. Image Capture is just simpler than iPhoto - straight from the camera to a folder, no Events or Faces or anything. –  ElendilTheTall Mar 30 '11 at 12:21
    
Oh, and transferring photos from your iPhone will always be quicker because they're relatively low quality JPEGs, not hoofing great DSLR RAW files. –  ElendilTheTall Mar 30 '11 at 12:24

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